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Wendig’s Flash Fiction Challenge: The Incubus’ Tale

Wendig’s Flash Fiction Challenge: The Incubus’ Tale published on 2 Comments on Wendig’s Flash Fiction Challenge: The Incubus’ Tale

Incubus Chuck Wendig gave us ten titles, one thousand words and one week to post on his latest flash fiction challenge. Here’s mine:

The Incubus’ Tale

“Still, if some are occasionally begotten from demons, it is not from the seed of such demons, nor from their assumed bodies, but from the seed of men, taken for the purpose; as when the demon assumes first the form of a woman, and afterwards of a man; just so they take the seed of other things for other generating purposes.”~Saint Thomas Aquinas

The wind rushed unrelenting over the parched land whirling the topsoil into a stinging whorl of fine sand and I hang back into the door jam. The sound of it was horrible, like the wail of demons joining in an awful chorus. I’ve shivered and gathered my cloak around me.

But I stand in quiet vigil. There was a note on my table by the gray stone fireplace. It said, “I will be there soon. Wait.”Continue reading Wendig’s Flash Fiction Challenge: The Incubus’ Tale

The Craft of #Writing: Lexical Density Compared to Writing Rules

The Craft of #Writing: Lexical Density Compared to Writing Rules published on No Comments on The Craft of #Writing: Lexical Density Compared to Writing Rules

The Craft of WritingI took some creative license in the title because we all know there aren’t any rules in writing. There is just some incredibly strong advice. The “rules” vary widely from writer to writer and even from genre to genre.

But there do seem to a few general “rules” floating out there that were captured by a Guardian article where they printed the rules of Elmore Leonard, whose rules seem to be derigeur today.

1.) Never open a book with the weather
2.) Avoid Prologues
3.) Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue.
4.) Never use an adverb to modify “said.”
5.) Keep your exclaimation points under control.
6.) Never use the words “suddenly” or “all hell broke loose”
7.) Use regional dialect and foreign words sparingly.
8.) Avoid detailed descriptions of characters
9.) Don’t go into great detail describing places and things
10.) Try to leave out the parts that readers tend to skip.
Other general admonitions handed out to beginning writers are “show, not tell” which runs along thing lines of Leonard’s eight, ninth and tenth rule. Writers are encourage to “show” what is happening rather than telling or writing the story like a news report.

Leonard’s rules seem to lean toward a lean and clean prose that doesn’t bog the reader down with word thick prose. Anything not essential to the telling of the immediate story is stripped away. What he seems to be leaning toward is “readability,” the facility of the prose to communicate to as many readers as possible.Continue reading The Craft of #Writing: Lexical Density Compared to Writing Rules

Five Ways to Use #Twitter To Grow Your Author’s Platform (With Examples)

Five Ways to Use #Twitter To Grow Your Author’s Platform (With Examples) published on 4 Comments on Five Ways to Use #Twitter To Grow Your Author’s Platform (With Examples)

Twitter Logo
Twitter Logo
Ah. Twitter. One hundred and forty characters of writely goodness. When I started blogging, oh back in the dark ages of blogging seven years ago, Twitter was just a toddler. At the time I was signing up for every platform possible to get my blog Astrology Explored noticed. When I encountered Twitter, which at the time defined itself as microblogging, I scratched my head. What the heck is one hundred forty characters good for?

I was so wrong.

Now, I admit to flailing around Twitter for a number of years so that it took this long for my astrology twitter Starrynightastr to reach one thousand one hundred and forty-three followers. I was quite proud of this until my son laughed at me with his two twitter accounts and over three thousand followers.

Twitter now stands is one of two de rigeur social media platforms nearly every writer uses. So much that new writers, once they set up their blogs run to twitter to set up their account. But now you have it, what do you do to make your followers grow?

What do you do to get followers on your team?Continue reading Five Ways to Use #Twitter To Grow Your Author’s Platform (With Examples)

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