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Feedspot Names Bethturnage.com a Top 40 Ghostwriter Blog

Feedspot Names Bethturnage.com a Top 40 Ghostwriter Blog published on 2 Comments on Feedspot Names Bethturnage.com a Top 40 Ghostwriter Blog

Feedspot names Bethturnage.com in the top forty of ghostwriter blogs
In September Feedspot sent me this thing
Out of the blue Feedspot sends me this handy dandy little award naming this writer’s blog a top forty ghostwriter blog.

Cool.

I’ve been a little too busy to post it, but seeing it languish in my draft section made me sad, so I’ll display it now for your perusal.

You can see the list of other top forty blogs here.

Thanks Feedspot!

#BookPromotion: #Free #TweetLove From #ReadersGazette

#BookPromotion: #Free #TweetLove From #ReadersGazette published on No Comments on #BookPromotion: #Free #TweetLove From #ReadersGazette

Twitter Promo Generated by Reader's Gazette
Twitter Promo Generated by Reader’s Gazette
Readers Gazette has one sole mission–putting readers and writers together. How cool is that? On their site a writer can list their kindle books and their blogs for the totally affordable price for FREE. Yep. Zero dollars.Totally within my price range. But what is even better is that they’ll tweet your book, ala the twitter ad you see here on their two twitter accounts, @ReadersGazette and @RGBookWorld. Again, free. And what’s even better is that you can keep up the tweet love by retweeting other listings on their accounts.

There are other ways to promote your book on Readers’ Gazette as well. You can list your blog, your book’s bargain price, and create games, quizzes and competitions. Cost. Zero.

What a bargain. And well worth the little time you put into registering your books.

Go here to register as a author and list your books.

Thank you Readers Gazette for your valuable service.

Image produced by Reader’s Gazette. Use of low resolution copyrighted images is permitted for commentary under U. S. Copyright right law.

#Howtoblog: Use #keywords to build your #author blog’s reach

#Howtoblog: Use #keywords to build your #author blog’s reach published on 2 Comments on #Howtoblog: Use #keywords to build your #author blog’s reach

blogging, writing, pagerank, keywords, how to blog
Increase your pagerank with keywords
Pagerank seems to be one of those little things that many writer-bloggers ignore. Maybe it’s because Google keeps changing the game rules, maybe because so few authors understand pagerank, or maybe because in the hectic life of a writer (must put down words, no time for anything else) it seems a tiny detail in the world of blogging.

It is not.

Pagerank is your SEO report card and if you are scoring a goose egg on pagerank, one thing is not happening. The search engines are not sending traffic your way.

Yes, I know. I gave you five sneaky ways to get website traffic, but if you are in this for the long haul you need every edge you can get. Securing a page rank is one edge. Some authors understand this better than others. Chuck Wendig has an immensely successful blog with a page rank of five for his main site and four for his blog. Kevin Hearne a page rank of four, which is pretty darn good on the Google end for a non-corporate blog. Obviously Kevin had someone do all the shiny SEO thingies to get the blog to that pagerank. The first actual author’s blog on Google, which is on page two is Advanced Fiction Writing which has a page rank of three. Now if someone is looking for author blogs who do you think is going to get that traffic?

Well, not Chuck. (Sorry, Chuck) And not Kevin, despite that page rank (Sorry, Kevin). The winner here is Advanced Fiction Writing who took the trouble of crafting the blog title around what, class? (Holds hand to ear) Continue reading #Howtoblog: Use #keywords to build your #author blog’s reach

Setting Up Your Website (for writers): Part 2

Setting Up Your Website (for writers): Part 2 published on No Comments on Setting Up Your Website (for writers): Part 2

Twenty Ten If you followed my advice you have your domain name and you’ve picked out your webhost. Good. You are on your way to setting up your own self-hosted website. Now to do the deed.

What we are going to do is the following:

Get your webhost and domain name provider talking.

Set up your domain name on your host provider.

Install WordPress.

Pick and install a WordPress theme.

Get Your Webhost and Domain Name Provider Talking

You may have bought your domain name from your host provider. This is the simplest solution, but not always to the most cost effective. However, if you did, skip this part and go to the next topic. However, if you did not then you need to set the Domain Name Servers on your domain provider’s site to the nameservers of your hostsite.

Your hostsite will provide your with your domain nameservers upon activation of your account. Nameservers come in pairs and look like this ns1234.yourhostsite.com & ns1235.yourhostsite.com Log into to your domain provider, pull up your account, and choice whatever option gets you to “Set Nameservers.” Type in your nameservers an press update. Though the process is the same, every site has its little variations, so I can’t get more specific than that, except in the case of GoDaddy.

Here are specific instructions for changing nameservers on GoDaddy:

1.) Log into your GoDaddy Account. On the “All Products” tab, go to “My Account”, then hit the “launch” button on “my domains”. Click on the little square box in front of your domain name and then the little “name server” box will light up. Click on “set nameserver”, then the “custom nameserver” radio button. Click on the link “Custom Nameserver” (You’re almost there) and enter your first nameservicer in the top box and an the second nameserver in the bottom box. Click the black “OK” button and the screen will say “validating”, then show a black “save” button. Hit the “save” button and the screen will return to show your domain name. Log out of GoDaddy.

Depending your domain provider’s site it can take several hours to up to a full day to connect to your hostsite.

Set Up Your Domain Name on Your C-Panel

Now its time to go to your hostsite and log-in to your C-Panel. Once there scan down the line of items to “Domains.” Click on “Addon Domains.” Type in the name of your domain with the “http” or “www” part of the name, for example “yourname.com”. C-Panel with automatically fill the boxes except your password. Enter the password you created for your website. Click on “Add domain.” Click “home” to take you back to C-Panel’s front page.

Install WordPress

Scan down software/services and click on Fantastico Deluxe. In Hostgator now there is also a button that says “Get Started with WordPress Today.” Either button is okay to click on. You will be sent to a screen that has a list of different blogging platforms. Click on WordPress. (And if necessary “continue.”) You’ll see the top line starting http:// and the name of your blog listed. Fill in the next boxes as listed and hit “Install.” (Oh, you are so close now.)

You’ll be taken to a screen that shows the installation. If you are prompted to add a email address and a password, do so. Finish up following the prompts. It’s time to pick out your WordPress theme.

Pick and Install a WordPress Theme

Let’s take a look at your website now. Every new WordPress installation comes with a standard theme. Go ahead, type in your brand new domain name into your browser and as long as the domain name provider and your hostprovider are talking, your site will come up. And it will look like the picture at the top. If the site doesn’t come up, because you just entered your nameservers, and the changes haven’t cycled, then wait a few hours.

Are you happy with 2010? Its a basic theme, clean in design and flexible. But if you want something extra, its easy enough to change the theme.

Type in http://yourdomainname.com/wp-admin/

This will always get you to the log in site. There should also be a “Log In” button on the page. Either way works. What you’ll see is the basic dashboard of your WordPress site.

Dashboard

Click on Appearance and then themes. You’ll be brought to the theme page. Click on the “Install Themes” tab at the top. Don’t worry, you aren’t doing any installing yet. You see a list of filters to click on. Click on any that appeal to you and press “Find Themes.” Up pops a selection of themes from which to choose. Take your time. Play with the filters or don’t use any filters at all, find something you like. When you do, click on “Install” and WordPress does its thing, and you now have your blog!

Congratulations! You are the owner of a self hosted blog. How professional is that?

Setting Up Your Website (For Writers)

Setting Up Your Website (For Writers) published on 2 Comments on Setting Up Your Website (For Writers)

Your Writer's BlogI started my professional writing career blogging. Yes, I know, most people don’t make money blogging, but I did, with an astrology blog on a now shuttered network. While I didn’t earn much money, I earned some, and while doing so I learned the fine art of blogging.

Its a given these days that writers should have their own websites. Every blog about writing I’ve seen advises so. There is nothing like putting yourself out there on the ‘net announcing you are a professional writer.

There are those of you who set up your Google Blogger blogs or your WordPress.com blogs and are happy with them. First off, they are free, which is a boon to underpaid writers everywhere. Secondly there is ease of use. If you don’t know how to set up a website there is nothing like preset templates to get you started.

But if you want to announce yourself as a professional writer there is nothing like the cache of your own domain name on a self-hosted site. Even with a free WordPress template you can make a very professional looking site for very little cash. There just isn’t a reason anymore for anyone to spend hundreds of dollars on a personal website even if my son, the website designer, needs the work.

WordPress is my platform of choice. There are literally hundreds of free templates and plug-ins that add functionality to your site.

So what are your first steps? First you need a domain name. Again there are hundreds of domain name providers, all with different pricing. I went with GoDaddy, and currently keep all my domain names there, though I might, when the price is right switch them to my hosting provider, Hostgator. Depending on various sales you can get your domain name from $10 to $20 dollars a year. Some domain providers advertise cheaper prices though those are usually one time sale prices for the first year. If you can manage it, buy your domain name for more than one year. It looks better to people like Google if your domain name has a shelf life longer than a year, but we’ll talk about that more in another post. If you can’t afford that, you need to work harder selling your work. The second is deciding on your host provider. I use Hostgator because I got a deal where I pay $15 per month for unlimited number of sites. Unfortunately, once you get the hang of buying domain names you start collecting them like you eat potato chips. Well at least I do, though it is a well known fact that I can eat only one potato chip and walk away from the bag. So it is a boon to have such a deal. And since the sites don’t draw mega traffic it works out just fine.

I like Hostgator though other people complain bitterly about them. They are cheap, relatively speaking. They keep my sites up. I can add as many new websites as I like, and access to WordPress templates through Fantastico, an installer program, is free. If you are searching for places to host your site, beware those that charge for every feature, such as email addresses and templates. It just isn’t necessary.

Once you get the hang of this not only can you snicker when your friends proudly display their Google blogger sites you can say with some pride, “Well, I self-host mine.”

Next post we’ll talk about actually setting up your site so until then buy your domain name and find your hosting site.

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